Suspected bomb blast at historic North Bengal Coronation Bridge

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Kalimpong: A video circulating on social media shows a suspected bomb attack atop the iconic Coronation Bridge in North Bengal. A lorry exploded on historic British-era infrastructure in Kalimpong Thursday morning.

A 22 km stretch known as the Chicken’s Neck Corridor connects the northeastern region to the rest of India. While on one side of this corridor is Bangladesh, on the other side is Nepal, making it a strategically important country. On this narrow corridor is the Coronation Bridge, also known as the Sevoke Bridge, over the River Teesta.

Initial reports said the blast was part of a film shoot, for which no prior permission was taken or granted, Kalimpong District Police Superintendent Aparajita Rai said. IsMojo.

“According to preliminary information, it was a film shoot this morning. An investigation has been opened. No prior authorization has been taken,” the SP said.

Questions are being raised, however, about how an iconic bridge, deemed fragile, was used for a film shoot involving a bomb blast. The incident also sparked a massive outpouring of outrage on social media.

The Coronation Bridge was named so to commemorate the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in 1937. The bridge was completed at a cost of Rs 4 lakh in 1941.

The foundation of the bridge was laid by John Anderson, then Governor of Bengal in 1937. The locals call the bridge Baghpool, meaning Tiger Bridge, because of the two tiger statues on both sides of the bridge.

Despite its age and poor maintenance, the bridge still serves its purpose of connecting the Northeast with the rest of India and is the most important connection between North Bengal and the Northeast, while also connecting districts like Darjeeling and Jalpaiguri to the rest of Bengal. The transport of essential goods and the movement of security forces also depend on this bridge.

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