Dairy producers are on the verge of exiting the industry due to soaring food production costs

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Dairy producers are on the verge of exiting the industry due to soaring food production costs

  • Survey says 7% of dairy farmers will quit in the next two years
  • A third of farmers plan to swap wheat for bread to make animal feed instead
  • Dairy farmers most concerned about feed, fuel, energy and fertilizer prices

Hundreds of farmers are planning to stop dairy farming in the next two years as they are driven out of business by rising food production costs.

A survey by the National Farmers Union indicated that 7% of dairy farmers will quit by 2024, which in national terms would mean 840 producers.

Over the next two years, dairy farmers were most concerned about the prices of feed (93%), fuel (91%), energy (89%) and fertilizer (88%).

In addition, a third of arable farmers plan to switch from growing wheat for bread to growing it for animal feed because it needs less fertilizer – the price of which has soared in recent months.

Hundreds of farmers plan to stop dairy farming in the next two years as they are driven out of business by rising food production costs

The findings, based on a survey of 610 dairy farmers and 525 farmers, highlight how the crisis caused by rising costs is affecting Britain’s ability to produce food and feed itself.

The NFU is calling on the government to introduce a legal requirement for ministers to assess the impact of the new policy on national food production.

NFU President Minette Batters said costs are rising rapidly on farms across the country.

“This is already impacting the food we produce… and leading to a crisis of confidence among farmers,” she said.

“With fertilizer prices doubling, feed and fuel prices rising, and the weather changing, the decisions farmers make now will look more like a gamble.”

The findings, based on a survey of 610 dairy farmers and 525 farmers, highlight how the crisis caused by rising costs is affecting Britain's ability to produce food and feed itself. [File photo]

The findings, based on a survey of 610 dairy farmers and 525 farmers, highlight how the crisis caused by rising costs is affecting Britain’s ability to produce food and feed itself. [File photo]

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